Friday, October 14, 2011

Can we rethink Gypsophelia?

I was asked by The Somerville Home to donate two centerpieces with a 70's theme.  Flower Power.
Honestly, I had to do a little research (not because I wasn't THERE)  and what I came up with was kind of disheartening.  But, hey, it was a donation and if I couldn't strut my stuff, well I was donating to a worthy cause.

Baby's Breath was wildly popular in the 70's.  And Daisies.  There you are.  Easy and fast.  But wait.

I went to one vendor this morning who had daisy plants (no marguerites in the market) and I grabbed  some Gypsophelia, and headed for the shop.  I'm not a BBB connoisseur..gyp is gyp.  But this bunch was so pretty I began to rethink my predjudice.  What if I didn't use it with anything.  Just sold bunches of it.  Could I find it again with tiny buds?

?



No, you say?  hmmm. It's kind of breaking my heart it's so tender.  Now what?

13 comments:

An Urban Cottage said...

I think our Gypsophela bias is from our mothers drying it so long it turned to dust.

I've seen it in gardens in Vermont and almost didn't recognize it as the same dusty sticks I grew up with.

Belinda @ Wild Acre said...

Ok, straight up, I really like super fresh gyp on its own in something rustic like a chippy enamel jug. But it stinks when it is old and crispy.

It looks utterly hideous and daft with anything vaguely tropical/exotic.

An annual version, elegans 'covent garden' is really lovely with softer, larger white flowers, so pretty.

Bow Street Flowers said...

Ya know, florists in my town still automatically add it to roses and customers will ask me," can you put some of that white stuff with those flowers" and it makes me cringe. Steve, it IS unrecognizable in gardens.
Thanks Belinda. I'm with you. I need a chippy enamel jug.

gillian. said...

you're such a softie for the under dogs.

flwrjane said...

I actually love gyp on its own. Maybe in a milk glass container or two, following the 70's show, arranged on an angle ( following me?)
with drifts of willow eucalyptus trailing out the bottom.

Swear to god this would be dreamy.

xo Jane

Bow Street Flowers said...

Gillian- I'm a softie for delicate and fragile looking and yes, the under dog.
Jane - how 'bout Ball jars with a bit of ribbon?

Jen of Country Weekend said...

I like the way you think, and rethink. They look beautiful in your pictures.

Falls Flowers said...

we used gyp for a wedding a few weekends ago, it was so lovely. i had the same feeling that you did. unfortunately, too much of it will still make me sick to my stomach (the smell!). martha's doing a pretty good job of bringing it back...

Bow Street Flowers said...

Thanks Jen! always rethinking.
Peicha, I was back at Quinlin's looking at the BBB this morning thinking it would look pretty arranged in a ball jar with a ribbon and then I visualized a customer asking " could you put a few of these (whatever) in the jar with them? oy. no I couldn't.

Sharon Parker said...

I once planted some creeping pink gypsophila (G. repens rosea) in a moss-lined basket that I let sit on top of a tree stump, and the following year I discovered that it had reseeded itself right in the stump. It was the sweetest thing, so delicate and ethereal, emerging from that big rotting stump. I still find it rather boring in bouquets, though I rather like Jane's idea. Perhaps it just needs different companions than the cliche of roses or daisies.

flowers on my table said...

I used it at a wedding a couple of years ago. I had huge baskets of it in the church, it was very very pretty. However I have a wedding to do next year, and the bride wants it in her bouquet with white Chrysanthemums. I will have to talk her out of that, as I think it will just look cheap. I have also seen it made into a wreath with an oasis ring, and that was pretty too. Good luck with your 70's arrangements. Love Linda x

The Monkey Flower Group said...

Yay for the floral underdogs, and especially the gardeny ones unjustly cast as mere zombie flowers!

A nearby grower sells gypsophelia at the farmers market, with those little buds. I love them mixed with floppy scabiosa, smelly stock, and plenty of pretty, fresh foliage from the garden. But you're right- it'd be dangerous to have them in the shop, lest they mix with the wrong crowd . . . : )

flowers on my table said...

Many thanks for your visit and comments on Halloween. I am so pleased you love the 'Vintage Flowers' book, it's lovely to find such inspiration, isn't it? Have a great week, with love, Linda x